Where We Work

The world’s most threatened communities are those living between its most valuable resources and its most powerful corporations.

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Where We Work

These communities are facing violence, exploitation, and an end to their traditional ways of life while the policies and decisions that threaten them are made behind the closed doors of corporate boardrooms and halls of government.

We combine the power of law and the power of people in defense of human rights and the environment, which we define as “earth rights”. We specialize in fact-finding, legal actions against perpetrators of earth rights abuses, training grassroots and community leaders, and advocacy campaigns. Through these strategies, EarthRights International seeks to end earth rights abuses, to provide real solutions for real people, and to promote and protect human rights and the environment in the communities where we work.

With offices in the United States, Myanmar, Thailand, and Peru, EarthRights International seeks to end earth rights abuses, to provide real solutions for real people, and to promote and protect human rights and the environment in the communities where we work. Our work spans 20 countries and continues to grow every year.

Whether we are challenging the World Bank Group’s legal immunity in U.S. federal court, working with the U’wa Nation in Colombia to protect their sacred land , training the next generation of earth rights defenders at our Earth Rights School in Thailand, or accompanying villagers from Myanmar to Japan to confront Japanese investors about the Thilawa Special Economic Zone, we are fighting for a world in which every person lives with the dignity of justice and human rights, on a planet where precious resources are shared equitably and preserved for the future.

Southeast Asia

A hub of human diversity, the Mekong region in Southeast Asia is home to 300 million people from hundreds of ethnic groups. Many people, particularly indigenous peoples, rely on the rivers and the surrounding ecosystems to live. As Southeast Asia renews its interest in coal and continues to build destructive dams on the Mekong River, the livelihoods of villagers in the Mekong River Basin are in jeopardy.

Latin America

Home to approximately 30 million people and more than 350 indigenous groups, the Amazon is the most biodiverse place in the world. The Andean region is also the home of many desired natural resources, including precious metals. Extractive companies and other large corporations continue to pose a great threat to the region. The powerful elite enjoy the benefits and the communities are left to pay the costs, with indigenous communities suffering the greatest consequences for these large-scale projects.

United States and Global

Corporations and financial institutions enjoy increased freedom due to legal loopholes and deregulation in transparency laws. It is our mission to pursue justice on behalf of communities around the world that have been intimidated, harmed, or killed at the hands of these corporations and institutions and hold them accountable. We seek innovative legal strategies to counter U.S.-based companies and financial institutions who believe they can get away with egregious human rights abuses as long as they are committed overseas.